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About


Monitor biodiversity with sound

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About


Monitor biodiversity with sound

 

Songscape uses machine learning and citizen science to identify animal calls in recordings

Record

Record your environment to capture the presence of birds and animals.

Upload

Submit your recordings to Songscape. Machine learning algorithms will score the recordings and identify calls.

Identify

Invite people to review the recordings, identify sounds, and start discussions about your project.

 
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Survey


Survey


 

Using acoustic monitoring?

We want to understand how scientists, community groups, and individuals are already using acoustic monitoring to discover what's around them. If you're using these techniques, please consider completing our brief survey.

 
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Contact


Contact


 

GET IN TOUCH

Could your biodiversity monitoring benefit from Songscape? We're currently looking for case studies and want to hear from people with great ideas for exciting projects. If you want to discuss using this technology further, contact us.

 
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Case Study


Case Study


CASE STUDY: How many kiwi are living in Rimutaka Forest Park?

The Rimutaka Forest Park Trust has been working alongside the New Zealand Department of Conservation since 1988 to restore the forest clad hills on the eastern side of Wellington.

Kiwi were first released into the park in 2006 and the population has grown from 6 adult birds to more than 100 roaming the 22,500 hectare park and adjacent areas.

As kiwi numbers increased, the task of tracking each bird in rugged terrain to attach and maintain radio transmitters on their legs became exhausting, expensive, and unsustainable.

 

Images provided under a creative commons attribution 3.0 license by Michael Dawes, Kimberley Collins and Michael Hamilton.